Friday, August 10, 2018

Nebraska: The Corn Hustle State

Nebraska Plans First Execution in 21 Years:

Carey Dean Moore, who faces the death penalty next week for killing two taxi drivers in Omaha in 1979, has stopped fighting his looming execution. But his life may be extended by a German drugmaker that says it produced two of the drugs that are to be injected into Mr. Moore’s veins.
Fresenius Kabi, one of Germany’s largest companies, has asked a judge to block the use of its drugs in Nebraska’s first execution in 21 years and its first-ever lethal injection. Use of the drugs, the company says, will cause grave harm to its reputation if products intended to help treat people are used to kill.
Fresenius says it takes no position on capital punishment, but that it has strict contracts with distributors that ban sales to prisons for executions or to anyone other than hospitals and other medical users. It says Nebraska illegally obtained both a muscle relaxant and a drug that, when given at extremely high doses, can stop a beating heart.
And like any good junkie or drug hustler, Nebraska is pulling out all the stops to conceal the source of their smack.
Nebraska is fighting separate legal efforts to force it to disclose where it got the drugs. A statement issued by Attorney General Doug Peterson said the drugs “were purchased lawfully and pursuant to the state of Nebraska’s duty to carry out lawful capital sentences.”
But neither the statement, nor state officials on Thursday, said which company manufactured the drugs, what temperature they are being stored at or whether an injunction would delay the execution. The offices of Mr. Peterson and the Nebraska governor, Pete Ricketts, did not respond to messages on Thursday.
I discussed the allegedly Catholic Governor Ricketts, who told the Pope to go to hell recently, in my last post.
Leslie Rutledge, the attorney general of Arkansas, one of the 15 states, argued that the companies “are being pressured by anti-death-penalty advocates to stop supplying the drug to carry out lawful executions,” adding: “The families of these victims deserve justice.”
The other states supporting Nevada’s effort to execute Mr. Dozier over the drug companies’ objections are Alabama, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Utah.
LOL. You knew Texas and Georgia would be involved somehow. Tennessee is a surprise, given the botched execution that took place last week. 
On Thursday night, Tennessee carried out its first execution since 2009, putting Billy Ray Irick to death for the rape and murder of a 7-year-old girl in 1985. The state used a combination of drugs that Mr. Irick’s lawyers had argued could make the condemned feel like they were burning alive and drowning.
According to The Tennessean newspaper, Mr. Irick “was coughing, choking and gasping for air” and “his face turned dark purple as the lethal drugs took over.”
Good ol' Rocky Top.

Should be interesting to watch as these junkie states, desperate to get their next fix of killin' drugs, keep going to court to defend themselves from allegations of drug hustling and dealing. 

I guess it's true, you really can't embarrass some people.

UPDATE: Got eem
Nebraska carried out its first execution in more than two decades on Tuesday with a drug combination never tried before, including the first use of the powerful opioid fentanyl in a lethal injection.
Carey Dean Moore, 60, was pronounced dead at 10:47 a.m. Moore had been sentenced to death for killing two cab drivers in Omaha in 1979. He was the first inmate to be lethally injected in Nebraska, which last carried out an execution in 1997, using the electric chair.
Moore’s execution comes a little more than three years after Nebraska lawmakers abolished the death penalty, only to have it reinstated the following year through a citizen ballot drive partially financed by Republican Gov. Pete Ricketts. The governor, a wealthy former businessman, has said he was fulfilling the wishes of voters in the conservative state.
Better get right with the Lord, Pete.

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