Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Debt Collectors In Scrubs

Debt Collectors Target Patients for Payment While Still in Hospital:

Hospital patients waiting in an emergency room or convalescing after surgery are being confronted by an unexpected visitor: a debt collector at bedside.

This and other aggressive tactics by one of the nation’s largest collectors of medical debts, Accretive Health, were revealed on Tuesday by the Minnesota attorney general, raising concerns that such practices have become common at hospitals across the country. 

The tactics, like embedding debt collectors as employees in emergency rooms and demanding that patients pay before receiving treatment, were outlined in hundreds of company documents released by the attorney general. And they cast a spotlight on the increasingly desperate strategies among hospitals to recoup payments as their unpaid debts mount. 

To patients, the debt collectors may look indistinguishable from hospital employees, may demand they pay outstanding bills and may discourage them from seeking emergency care at all, even using scripts like those in collection boiler rooms, according to the documents and employees interviewed by The New York Times. 
It reminds me of the old joke: what's the difference between a debt collector and a pedophile? There isn't one.
Collection activities extended from obstetrics to the emergency room. In July 2010, an Accretive manager told staff members at Fairview that they should “get cracking on labor and delivery,” since there is a “good chunk to be collected there,” according to company e-mails. 

Employees were told to stall patients entering the emergency room until they had agreed to pay a previous balance, according to the documents. Employees in the emergency room, for example, were told to ask incoming patients first for a credit card payment. If that failed, employees were told to say, “If you have your checkbook in your car I will be happy to wait for you,” internal documents show. 

Employees at Accretive’s client hospitals ask patients to make “point of service” payments before they receive treatment. Until she went to Fairview for her son Maxx’s ear tube surgery in November, Marcia Newton, a stay-at-home mother in Corcoran, Minn., said she had never been asked to pay for care before receiving it. “They were really aggressive about getting that money upfront,” she said in an interview.
Ms. Newton was shocked to learn that the employees were debt collectors. “You really feel hoodwinked,” she said. 

While hospital collections at Fairview increased, patient care suffered, the employees said. “Patients are harassed mercilessly,” a hospital employee told Ms. Swanson. 

In March 2011, doctors at Fairview complained that such strong-arm tactics were discouraging patients from seeking lifesaving treatments, but Accretive officials dismissed the complaints as “country club talk.”
Outstanding. And obviously too stupid to realize how, precisely, their employers at the hospitals really view them.

Worse, within the collection industry, they even threaten their own collection agency employees with termination if they don't shake down, er, try to collect enough money from women trapped in stirrups during child birth.
Accretive says that it trains its staff to focus on getting payment through “revenue cycle operations.” Accretive fostered a pressurized collection environment that included mandatory daily meetings at the hospitals in Minnesota, according to employees and the newly released documents. Employees with high collection tallies were rewarded with gift cards. Those who fell behind were threatened with termination.
“We’ve started firing people that aren’t getting with the program,” a member of Accretive’s staff wrote in an e-mail to his bosses in September 2010. 
LOL. Reminds me of that scene in Glengarry Glenn Ross. "Gentlemen? First prize for top sales, a set of steak knives. Second prize? You're fired."

Thankfully, some attorney's general are starting to slap these criminals, er debt collectors, with sanctions.
In the January lawsuit, [Minnesota Attorney General Lori] Swanson said that by giving its collectors access to health records, Accretive violated the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, known as Hipaa (pronounced HIP-ah). For example, an Accretive collection employee had access to records that showed a patient had bipolar disorder, Parkinson’s disease and a host of other conditions.
In addition, she said, the company broke state collections laws by failing to identify themselves as debt collectors when dealing with patients. 
Makes me wonder if we reformed health care in this country (really reformed it) whether we'd need debt collectors coming into your hospital room, getting in your grille while you're convalescing from god knows what.

No comments: